The 2014–15 Season

A.C.T.'s Geary Theater


“One of the most affecting tributes to theater and tenacity you’re likely to see all year. Get in line ASAP!”

New York Post

“Scary and sweet, funny but dead serious, unique and wonderfully theatrical."Time magazine

In a post-apocalyptic Bay Area, a group of strangers bond by recreating the infamous “Cape Feare” episode of The Simpsons. From this fortuitous meeting, distant memories of “Marge” and “Homer” become the basis for shaping a new society as the play travels decades into the future. An outrageous and enthusiastically acclaimed new comedy by Anne Washburn, Mr. Burns is both a marvelous meta-tribute to the iconic first-family of twenty-first-century pop-culture and a celebration of the power of generational storytelling. A sold-out success in New York, critics exclaimed that “Mr. Burns, a post-electric play has arrived to leave you dizzy with the scope and dazzle of its ideas. Ms. Washburn makes us appreciate anew the profound value of storytelling in and of itself, and makes a case for theater as the most glorious and durable storyteller of all.” (New York Times)

  

A.C.T.'s Geary Theater


“[Kwei-Armah is] one of Britain’s most talented and distinctive writers”
WYPR

“Often comic and ultimately touching”The Telegraph, London

Let There Be Love is an intimate and often humorous family drama by Kwame Kwei-Armah, one of Britain’s most distinguished contemporary playwrights. Alfred, a cantankerous and aging West Indian immigrant living in London, has managed to alienate all those around him—including his equally headstrong lesbian daughter, with whom he rarely sees eye to eye. When an idealistic young Polish caregiver, new to the country, is assigned to look after him, he experiences a powerful reckoning with his past. Filled with the sumptuous jazz standards that pour forth from Alfred’s beloved gramophone and featuring a tour-de-force performance from stage and screen star Carl Lumbly, Let There Be Love explores the unrelenting grip of memory, regret, and forgiveness—and what can happen when we welcome new possibilities.

  

A.C.T.'s Geary Theater


“No score of Sondheim’s is as buoyant and thoroughgoing an example of musical comedy”

Wall Street Journal

“Sophisticated and enchanting”New York Times

Stephen Sondheim’s most rapturous and seductive musical waltzes onto the stage in a sumptuous, all-new production. Filled with Sondheim’s signature wit and some of his most gorgeous melodies—including the beloved and haunting treasure “Send in the Clowns”—A Little Night Music presents a beguiling and bittersweet tale of lost love, scandalous infidelity, and young passions that intertwine over a midsummer’s eve at a country home in 1900s Sweden. This ravishing production will sweep audiences away with mesmerizing theatrical storytelling that ignites the senses.

  

A.C.T.'s Strand Theater


“Exhilarating! Dizzying . . . thought-churning, deeply poignant. Leave it to Ms. Churchill to come up with a work that so ingeniously and exhaustively mirrors our age of the splintered attention span.”
New York Times

“[An] exhilarating theatrical kaleidoscope! Churchill suggests, with compassionate urgency, that our insatiable appetite for knowledge needs to be informed by our capacity for love.”The Guardian, UK

“★★★★! The wit, invention and structural ingenuity of Churchill’s work are remarkable.”Telegraph, UK

“All You Need Is Love . . . and Information”—HuffingtonPost.com

From iconoclastic playwright Caryl Churchill (Cloud NineTop Girls) comes Love and Information, an acclaimed new play that features 57 brief yet memorable scenes that make up a world where data inspires obsession, and FaceTime conversations and celebrity selfies threaten to replace human contact IRL. Premiering as the inaugural production at A.C.T.’s new Strand Theater—located in the heart of San Francisco’s tech community—this sharp yet tender theatrical kaleidoscope plays out like a fragmented newsfeed of moments, examining “our civilization’s lust for information, our inability to process it, and our loss of secrecy and privacy” (Gothamist.com). Churchill challenges audiences to consider the fateful, intimate dance between the virtual and the real, and the ways we filter data in the Information Age. In this provocative and fast-paced world of mysterious conversations, populated by 140 characters hungry for understanding, Churchill reminds us that no matter what the latest gadgets and hottest Internet memes are, the primary currency of choice will always be connection.

  

 

All titles, artists, and dates are subject to change.